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“A great Christian soul, whose golden voice charmed and lifted teeming thousands to pinnacles of untrammeled ecstasy and glorious hallelujahs born of the soul.”

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When the union of American states was reconstructed after the carnage of Civil War, African Americans served in public office throughout the South, including Memphis.

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Beginning Jan. 8, the Mallory-Neely House will be open to visitors Fridays and Saturdays from noon to 4 p.m.. Tours will operate hourly until 4 p.m.

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To heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis, he was “one of the closest friends I ever had.” For golf great Bobby Jones, he was a “delightful and charming person” who “meant much to us in Augusta and to the Masters Tournament. Some of the very finest writing about the tournament has come from him.” His name was Walter Stewart and he was from Memphis.

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As historian Michael Finger explained, Wilde was “perhaps the leading voice of a burgeoning movement that encouraged the appreciation of all things beautiful.”

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It was cold in Memphis when a well-dressed man and his girlfriend left the Forrest Park Hotel on the evening of Dec. 18, 1928. His wallet bulged with 200 $100 bills as they climbed into a Yellow Taxi heading for the city’s night clubs. What happened to these two visitors from St. Paul, Minne…

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Memphis has been home to several important historians who have chronicled our city’s storied past. One of the most significant was Fred L. Hutchins, who preserved a part of Memphis history that would have been lost without his dedicated effort.

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Big Round Records’ new archival recording – “Berl Olswanger and the Olswanger Beat” -- is the label’s third release of digitized records by the popular Memphis musician known as Mr. Music.

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Many agencies are remembered to this day -- the Civilian Conservation Corps, Tennessee Valley Authority and the Works Progress Administration.

One agency that has been forgotten is the National Youth Administration, which allowed many students to stay in school and helped others to gain skills that assisted them in finding meaningful employment. NYA offices were established across the nation, including in Memphis.

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For information about health, finance and lifestyles of Mid-Southerners over 50 watch WKNO-TV’s half-hour magazine-style series called “The Best Times” airing Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. on WKNO Channel 10.

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In 1910 a Japanese immigrant named Kuni Wada opened a bakery in the Crosstown neighborhood of Memphis. When curious Memphians sampled his bread, pastries and biscuits they quickly made it the most popular bakery in the city.

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Mississippi River pilot has inspired many writers to celebrate the folklore and history of perhaps America’s greatest body of water.

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In the 1840s a young Italian named Amanze Pacini visited Memphis before returning to his home in Valdottavo. This brief visit had a profound effect not only on his family and the development of Memphis, but also the history of American popular music.

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Temperatures hovered around 37 degrees on Dec. 11, 1937, as Memphis leaders gathered to support The Commercial Appeal’s and American Legion’s Christmas charity, the Mile-O-Dimes.

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Recently, at the North American Mature Publishers Association convention, The Best Times received six awards for journalism excellence.

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After more than a year of undergoing a complete restoration by JL Weiler Inc. in Chicago, the Orpheum’s Mighty Wurlitzer pipe organ has returned to Memphis.

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Several famous performers appeared in the many theaters dotting Memphis’s landscape. In the 19th century, opera singer Jenny Lind and noted actor Edwin Booth (whose brother John Wilkes murdered President Abraham Lincoln) played in Memphis while such celebrated vaudevillians as Jack Benny, Mi…

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Beale Street may be the most famous street in Memphis history but Poplar Avenue has also done much to shape the destiny of the Bluff City by providing a transportation corridor connecting Memphis to rural Shelby County and beyond.

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Memphian named Mary Yerger Raymond who wrote a series of romance novels published in the Memphis Press-Scimitar newspaper.

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Throughout much of its history Memphis has played a major role in the production of food for the United States and the world.

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Singer Kate Smith expressed the feeling of people across America when her noontime talk radio show came on the air from New York 76 years ago on June 6, 1944,

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On Feb. 15, 1936, Memphian J. Garland Ogden walked into the YMCA building in Shanghai, China, and joined a card game. As he held his pasteboards and watched the other players, Ogden suddenly found himself in a world of trouble. Agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation rousted the play…

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When Memphians living in the 1930s turned their radio dials to WHBQ at 9 on Wednesday nights, they heard the “Italian Serenaders” program hosted by Sophia Grilli.

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In Roy Rogers movies and TV shows, the horse you often saw instead of the original Trigger was a little publicized horse called Little Trigger.

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The history of a community is often influenced by extreme weather conditions. This was true of Memphis in the summer of 1980 when a severe heat wave killed many of its citizens and strained the resources of city and county government.

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On the sunny afternoon of April 14, 1955, David Norris and Cornelius Hopps left their African American school and headed home. Around the same time, two white teenagers, David Denton and Perry Wallis, were riding bicycles when they spotted a big stick floating in a drainage basin at the inte…

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WKNO-TV’s half-hour magazine-style series called “The Best Times” features segments on the health, finance and lifestyles of Mid-Southerners over 50, based on and produced in cooperation with this monthly publication of the same name, The Best Times. The program is sponsored by The Plough Fo…

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During the 1920s, minstrel show performer Lincoln Perry created a character for his first film role that made him the first African- American movie star. However, his struggle for equal treatment combined with widespread opposition to the character he portrayed, forced Perry to flee Hollywoo…

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For more than 50 years, immigrants from Korea have been settling in Memphis and contributing to the growth of the city. According to the Korean Association of Memphis, the first Korean to move to Memphis was Kim Yeon-ok, who arrived in 1962. Since then several thousand Korean Americans have …

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Enjoy scenes from oldtime Christmases with Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadiians as they play and sing “An Old-Fashioned Christmas Tree” accompanied with pictures from several decades in the past.

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For several years now, I have gone to sleep each night listening to radio dramas from the 1940s and early 1950s. And when I wake up during the night, I listen to them to get back to sleep.

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In 1878 Memphis’ fifth Catholic Church, St. Joseph’s, was opened at the corner of Georgia and Florida streets in the southern section of the city. Designed to serve the city’s growing Italian population, it became one of the oldest and most important Catholic congregations in the City of Memphis.

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Every time I see the jars of Peter Pan Peanut Butter on the grocery shelf I think of Sky King, not the TV show, but the radio show of the late 1940s and early 1950s.

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The 2016 book “Hidden Figures” by Margot Lee Shetterly and the subsequent Hollywood film of the same name chronicled the lives of several African American women who were skilled mathematicians and made many contributions to aeronautics, computer science, mathematics and space exploration.

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Earlier this year, The Commercial Appeal carried a headline that read “Hawaii too pricey for teachers.” Perhaps you resonate to the title because your Visa card is not overprone to handle an exotic trip just at present. Maybe vicarious travel is more compatible with your non-budget. May I re…

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The number of American children affected by acute hepatitis of unknown cause continues to grow, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Wednesday.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Faced with mounting pressure to help desperate parents, President Joe Biden on Wednesday invoked the power of the wartime Defense Production Act to get more infant formula into American homes.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The first U.S. case this year of a rare and potentially fatal virus known as monkeypox has been diagnosed in a man in Massachusetts who recently traveled to Canada, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday.

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The annual meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists was held from May 6 to 8 in San Diego and attracted more than 4,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in obstetrics and gynecology. The conference highlighted recent advances in the prevention, detection, and treatment of conditions impacting women, with presentations focusing on the advancement of health care services for women worldwide.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A panel of science advisers to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevent recommended on Thursday that a single booster dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine can be given to 5- to 11-year-olds.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A baby formula plant closed in February at the heart of the current U.S. shortage of the product could reopen as soon as next week, U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Robert Califf told House lawmakers on Thursday.

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The CDC is now working with Massachusetts health officials to investigate a case of Monkeypox in a resident there. It's a disease that's popping up in several countries that don't normally report it, including the US. Today, the US Surgeon General is telling Americans to be aware but not to worry.

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Inflation is up, the stock market is down, and I bonds have suddenly come into vogue due to an unprecedented interest rate of 9.62%. But while I bonds can help…

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Pollution remains responsible for about 9 million deaths per year, or one in six deaths worldwide, according to a review published online May 17 in The Lancet Planetary Health.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Sickle cell disease (SCD) imposes a considerable burden in terms of overall and out-of-pocket medical costs, with the burden of costs peaking in young adulthood, according to a study published online May 16 in Blood Advances.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of adolescent vaping is 8.6 percent in 47 lower-middle, upper-middle, and high-income countries, and the prevalence of frequent vaping is 1.7 percent, according to a study published online May 11 in Addiction.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Time-restricted eating (TRE), limiting energy intake to eight hours followed by fasting for 16 hours (16:8 TRE), is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among older breast cancer survivors (BCS), according to a research letter published online May 17 in JACC: CardioOncology.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine contributed to substantial public health impact and vaccine-preventable cost savings in the first year of its U.S. rollout, according to a study published online May 15 in the Journal of Medical Economics.

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(Broadry) — Want to take your dog on vacation? You’re not alone. According to a new survey by Wag!, pet parents would travel more often if it were easier to bring along their dogs.  “People are getting more dogs. They are adopting more dogs. Dogs are becoming more of our culture so it doesn’t surprise […]

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Providing surgical fellows with operative autonomy does not appear to compromise long-term outcomes of abdominal wall reconstructions (AWRs), according to a study published online May 17 in JAMA Network Open.

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(Broadry) — Want to take your dog on vacation? You’re not alone. According to a new survey by Wag!, pet parents would travel more often if it were easier to bring along their dogs.  “People are getting more dogs. They are adopting more dogs. Dogs are becoming more of our culture so it doesn’t surprise […]

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The number of American children affected by acute hepatitis of unknown cause continues to grow, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Wednesday.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Faced with mounting pressure to help desperate parents, President Joe Biden on Wednesday invoked the power of the wartime Defense Production Act to get more of the precious product into American homes.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The first U.S. case this year of a rare and potentially fatal virus known as monkeypox has been diagnosed in a man in Massachusetts who recently traveled to Canada, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a COVID-19 shot after you've been infected could reduce your risk of developing prolonged COVID symptoms, or so-called long COVID, according to a new study.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. pedestrian deaths in 2021 were the highest in four decades, with an average of 20 deaths every day, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Experimental stem cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease shows promise in rats and will soon be tested in a human clinical trial, researchers say.

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THURSDAY, May 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survival rates rose more in states that expanded Medicaid under Obamacare than in those that did not, and rates increased most among Black patients and those in rural areas, according to a new study.